Saturday, November 17, 2018

Tonsil Medicine Name | Nursing Management of Tonsillitis Disease

What is Tonsillitis Disease?
Tonsils or tonsillitis disease are the two lymph nodes which are located on each side of the back of our throat. They function as a defense mechanism. They help to prevent your body from infection. When the tonsils become infected, the condition is termed as tonsillitis.

Tonsillitis disease can happen at any age and it is a common childhood infection. Tonsillitis disease is most often diagnosed in children from preschool age through their mid-teens. There are some common symptoms of tonsillitis disease are swollen tonsils, sore throat, and fever. 
Management of tonsillitis disease
Fig: Management of tonsillitis disease
The condition is contagious and can be caused by a variety of common viruses and bacteria such as streptococcal bacteria which causes strep throat. Tonsillitis caused by strep throat which can lead to serious complications if left untreated. Tonsillitis is easily diagnosed. Symptoms of tonsillitis disease usually go away within 7 to 10 days.

Nursing Management of Tonsillitis Disease:

Nursing Management of Acute Tonsillitis Disease:
It includes- 

  1. Antipyretics,
  2. Bed rest,
  3. Liquid or soft diet,
  4. Analgesic,
  5. An analgesic lozenge in the early stage is helpful,
  6. Systematic antibiotics (penicillin) should be administrated parentally for 7 days,
  7. Isolation from other children to prevent the spread of infection,
  8. Hot saline gargle or gargles with aspirin in solution may be useful,
  9. Other antibiotics (erythromycin, cephalexin) can be served.

Nursing Management of Chronic Tonsillitis Disease:
Management of chronic tonsillitis is done with tonsillectomy. It is indicated if medical treatment is unsuccessful and there is severe hypertrophy of tonsils. It should be advised in more than six significant attacks of tonsillitis in a year for two consecutive years and presence of the peritonsillar or retrotonsiliar abscess.

Nursing Management of Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy:
Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy are done under general anesthesia. After surgery-

  1. The child is placed in a side-lying position (tonsillectomy position).
  2. As bleeding is the main complication of tonsillectomy, this position facilitates drainage of any blood and secretions and prevents their aspiration and swallowing.
  3. A child is closely observed in the post-operative period for swallowing movements of the throat.
  4. Repeated swallowing movement means that there is bleeding and the child is swallowing it.
  5. Pulse is recorded every fifteen minutes and a rising pulse rate is again a feature of bleeding. A falling blood pressure also indicates bleeding.
  6. When a child becomes conscious and if permitted by the anesthetist, he may be given cold fluids like fruit juices or cold drinks.
  7. Later on, soft foods are also started.

List of Antibiotics for Tonsillitis Disease:
The below list presents the medicine name of tonsillitis disease.

  1. Zinacef,
  2. Suprax,
  3. Cepacol Dual Relief Sore Throat,
  4. Chloraseptic Sore Throat Lozenges,
  5. Benzocaine,
  6. Cefprozil,
  7. Cepacol Sore Throat,
  8. Aspirin/chlorpheniramine/phenylephrine,
  9. Bicillin L-A,
  10. Penicillin g benzathine,
  11. Trocaine,
  12. Cepacol Fizzlers,
  13. Cheracol Sore Throat,
  14. Assure Sore Throat,
  15. Cefditoren,
  16. Procaine penicillin,
  17. Laryngesic,
  18. Penicillin G Procaine,
  19. Amoxicillin,
  20. Spectracef,
  21. Wycillin,
  22. Azithromycin Dose Pack,
  23. Amoxil,
  24. Chloraseptic Sore Throat Spray,
  25. Zithromax,
  26. Cefuroxime,
  27. Cefdinir,
  28. Azithromycin,
  29. Clarithromycin,
  30. Penicillin VK,
  31. Benzocaine / menthol,
  32. Ceftin,
  33. Moxatag,
  34. Cefixime,
  35. Apo-Amoxi,
  36. Biaxin,
  37. Cefadroxil,
  38. Phenol,
  39. Zmax,
  40. Penicillin v potassium,
  41. Moxilin,
  42. Duricef,
  43. Cefpodoxime,
  44. Cefaclor,
  45. Cefzil.